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Microsoft recently advertised a job position available in the Windows Core User Experiences team. When searching for its newest software engineer it might have accidentally leaked a few details that hint at a bit of a makeover headed its way. Take a look at this and see what you think;

“On this team, you’ll work with our key platform, Surface, and OEM partners to orchestrate and deliver a sweeping visual rejuvenation of Windows experiences to signal to our customers that Windows is BACK and ensure that Windows is considered the best user OS experience for customers.”

The references to this “sweeping visual rejuvenation” were quickly removed after a hubbub of excitement began echoing online from Windows enthusiasts.

Microsoft hasn’t been shy about discussing an overhaul. Just like the Fluent Design system afforded to Windows 10 operation brought big changes to the interface, so will this next upgrade. The company has previously promised that we could see it debuted later in the coming year. The Windows 10 21H2 ‘Sun Valley’ Update is going to be more than just an aesthetic revamp. So what could we expect to see?

Windows 10
A new Windows 10 menu from 2020. Image credit: theverge.com

According to an article from Windows Central dating back to last October and a recent write-up by Tom Warren for the verge these UI changes will be mostly functional. The key focus at the moment is on the consistency of workflow so they will be looking to change the practical way we interface with things. In the released documentation it has been dished that Microsoft plans to update the Start menu, File Explorer, and built-in apps in Windows 10 to modernize them and make the UI more consistent. Some changes of the UI will also include updates to the sliders, buttons, and controls that are found throughout Windows and the apps that run on the OS.

Besides that, Microsoft is planning on improving its tablet mode experience, particularly how devices like the company’s Surface line switch between mouse/trackpad usage, and touch-based interactions.

Throughout recent years, Microsoft has been working on improving its UI consistency and as a result, a lot of that will be found in Windows 10X. Almost a year ago the company also rolled out new Windows 10 icons and some minor tweaks to the Start menu a few months later.

This renewed interest in Windows comes at the hands of a surge in users during the pandemic. Last October Surface chief Panos Panay started looking after Windows, teasing us with possible future Windows 10 UI polishes. No one knows exactly what to expect but it certainly looks like ‘Windows is BACK’.

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