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Facebook launched an update with a new feature for users warning them about the 30 percent tax on in-app purchases that Apple charges. It wasn’t a long-play campaign because Apple has already banned it. According to The Verge, Apple has commented on this saying that it’s a violation of App Store rules that don’t let developers show “irrelevant” information to users.

The new feature from Facebook lets users purchase tickets for online events directly through the app. Hmm… haven’t we seen this already? Apple denies such ambitious moves, claiming that when a user is purchasing digital content, it should be by using the App Store’s payment system, so the company can earn 30 percent of the total. Facebook asked Apple to soothe the cut-out so the revenue will go to event organizers, but Apple refused. You can still use Facebook’s feature, but without mentioning Apple’s 30 percent cut. 

You can check how it should have been because Facebook released an image with a message earlier this month.

Image credit: theverge.com

“Now more than ever, we should have the option to help people understand where the money they intend for small businesses actually goes,” Facebook said in a statement to Reuters. “Unfortunately, Apple rejected our transparency notice around their 30 percent tax, but we are still working to make that information available inside the app experience.”

Facebook escaped a strict punishment from Apple and it’s unclear how exactly, but still Apple blocked the notice. Apple has shown a pattern of how to work with apps that tries to explain App Store policies – “apps like Netflix, Kindle, and Spotify, for example, aren’t allowed to mention that users could pay on the web without Apple taking a cut, much less provide a link to do so,” writes The Verge. 

The situation didn’t come from thin air, because earlier Epic Games, the developer of Fortnite, has made the same thing explaining that Apple wants too much.

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