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What is the similarity between iPhone, PC and Xbox? 

The question was raised over and over again on the third day of Epic v. Apple testimony. Adi Robertson from The Verge released a nice material that explains the situation in detail. 

So, what to start with? First of all, you should know that the “deathmatch” between Apple and Epic is still on the go. The antitrust trial was initiated on Monday with a reminder speech that the heart of the case is Fortnite. On Tuesday both sides of the case argued about whether iPhones and iPads were truly locked down. And such speculations led to the other concerning question: iOS violates antitrust law would make every major game console an unlawful monopoly too.

Epic’s argument will bring imbalance

Apple compared their business model with other global companies such as Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft/ The company said that they are the same and “If Epic prevails, other ecosystems will fall too,”. But yesterday Epic called up Microsoft’s Xbox business development head Lori Wright as a sympathetic witness. Wright divided computing devices into “special-purpose” and “general-purpose” devices — in a way that clearly defined iPhones as the latter.

According to Wright’s words, the Xbox is a special-purpose device. “You are basically building a piece of hardware to do a specific thing,” she told a judge. “The Xbox is designed to give you a gaming experience. People buy an Xbox because they want to play games.” 

However, according to this statement, Windows computers are “general-purpose” devices. “You’re buying it to do a wide variety of things, and that changes every day as new ideas are getting created,” she said. “It can do a bunch of things already, and it has the aperture to do a bunch more things.”

Also, Wright mentioned a lot of ways how users can get apps on Windows. To be more precise you can download through Steam, the Epic Games Store, and direct downloads from a website. The commission on Windows apps stands still” 12 percent for Windows apps and 30 percent for Xbox.

Profit for Apple vs Profit for Epic

Back again to Wright’s statement, the iPhone is a general-purpose device. Wright also linked the distinction to one of Epic’s major talking points: profit. Epic gave a more detailed explanation for this. Profit means that it is easier for iPhone to treat app makers, but for consoles, it is not. Unlike Apple, console makers need to plan around attracting developers. As a Microsoft’s spokesperson, Wright noticed that no Xbox console has been sold at a profit, even late in a generation’s lifespan after manufacturing costs fall. So this leads companies to attract people who will develop a particular genre app, rather than simply build it, send them swimming and look at what happens.

Apple didn’t spend as much effort to counter-strike those definitions. According to The Verge’s original article, Apple’s strategy relied more on questioning Wright’s credibility by noting that she’d failed to produce documents that Apple requested.

Apple can get a profit from this situation because: Epic began these arguments by saying that iOS should work more like macOS. Both operating systems have got everything alike except one thing: macOS allows you to install software from outside the App Store. “Epic’s opening statement questioned why Apple needed to lock down the iPhone when it had already created a perfectly workable but more open system. But with Wright and Microsoft, Apple has a perfect comparison point: a major computing company that offers two very different versions of a big black box.”

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