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A prototype flying car successfully reached a destination point in Bratislava, Slovakia. The departure was from Nitra and the flight took 35-minute to complete the test. According to the BBC original article the hybrid car-aircraft, AirCar, has a BMW engine under the hood and runs on regular petrol-pump fuel. Prof Stefan Klein is the creator of this prototype and he said that the car could surpass up to 1,000km, at a height of 2,500m and had clocked up 40 hours in the air so far. The car can change its clothes into an aircraft for two minutes and 15 seconds.

To drive the flying car is very pleasant

AirCar with folded wings
AirCar with folded wings. Image credit: klein-vision.com

As you can see in the photo car wings are narrow and folded along both sides of the car. Prof Klein made a demonstration runaway and into the town for invited journalists. Also he described the experience, early on Monday morning, as “normal” and “very pleasant”. In the air the car reached 170km/h speed. Also it can carry two people with a weight limit of 200kg. Unfortunately, because of its peculiarities it cannot land and start vertically as a drone-taxi. Besides, such a prototype requires a runaway.

In 2019, consultant company Morgan Stanely predicted the rising expectations for the market. Also in the material there is a forecast that the sector of flying cars could be worth $1.5trillion (£1tn) by 2040. 

The market will rise

Klein Vision is the company that stands behind the AirCar, mentioned that it took two years to create the prototype and “less than 2m euros” (£1.7m) in investment. Anton Zajac, and adviser and investor in Klein Vision remarked that the company can reach a huge success if even a small part of global airline or taxi sales will attract the project. 

“There are about 40,000 orders of aircraft in the United States alone,” he said.

“And if we convert 5% of those, to change the aircraft for the flying car – we have a huge market.”

There are some questions to the AirCar

AirCar preparing for a flight
Image credit: klein-vision.com

BBC asked Dr Stephen Wright, senior research fellow in avionics and aircraft, at the University of the West of England. He described the AirCar as “the lovechild of a Bugatti Veyron and a Cesna 172”.

And he did not think the vehicle would be particularly loud or uneconomical in terms of fuel costs, compared with other aircraft.

“I have to admit that this looks really cool – but I’ve got a hundred questions about certification,” Dr Wright said.

“Anyone can make an aeroplane but the trick is making one that flies and flies and flies for the thick end of a million hours, with a person on board, without having an incident.

“I can’t wait to see the piece of paper that says this is safe to fly and safe to sell.”

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