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When the world was out of jokes about the global lockdown, the depression of the 21st century began. I’ve seen several theories that people have exaggerated in a negative way about all the circumstances happening in 2020. That’s because we’ve no other options programmed in our software and we react like it’s our first bitter experience. If we carefully touch world history, we’ll notice a developing pattern that happens over and over again. 

It can be only an apparent coincidence because we can’t make time move backward, can we? Christopher Nolan can make it glide forward or backward, as you wish, in his new sci-fi blockbuster “Tenet”. It would seem the time travel topic has outlived its usefulness and all ideas are just a blank canvas to which a local cafe demonstrates the film through any project under the sun. 

Christopher Nolan literally fulfills the empty plate with a fresh idea to speculate on. Time is an infinite topic where philosophers take the most contrasting ideas to think over while scientists are blowing their minds to find the arguments that time travel is impossible, or to prove the opposite. It’s like a thread that leads to the exit but there isn’t any way out. 

I’m glad to accept the fact that this is the first film I’ve seen after the strict lockdown, and it’s a mind-blowing blockbuster. I’m a little upset that it’s a blockbuster. Tenet is a packed film with everything Nolan could give to it. The film wasn’t poisoned by the dominating blockbuster genre, it was its vaccine. It’s the best way to explain the next time travel theory; not on paper, but in action. You won’t find the answer to whether Nolan is wrong or not. All arguments against or for it sound preposterous without visual arguments. That’s what philosophers and scientists call time travel paradox.  

The main character of Tenet, who hides under the code name The Protagonist (John David Washington), has a chance to play with time travel on his own. Have you noticed this? You don’t have a choice to empathize with the main character because he doesn’t even have a name. And you don’t need it – because all you attention will be on why the f***k this gun swallowed a bullet or why this Boeing 747 blows into small pieces and then unblows.

Besides, the film has got a lot of other scenes that might be quite familiar for espionage genre lovers. There are a lot of fight scenes where you don’t understand who is a villain or not. What am I talking about? Of course there are a lot of villains and two-five characters who stand against them. There are also weapon traders who are Russian oligarchs, agent organizations who are hiding under the cover of the shade, and Robert Pattinson, God bless his productivity, who plays a conservative British agent, Neil, with a light accent. 

Tenet has the right to be on the shelf among other spy films because there is literally no gap in it. Fighting, blowing up, and other pyrotechnic scenes don’t look overfilled because of Nolan’s idea of shooting a reverse scene. Actually, it’s a generous wonder, when you look at the film and the way it goes, but some stuff doesn’t work as it should – note the scene with reverse shooting. 

Tenet demonstrates a rare time travel theory, please hit me, Nolan, if I explain it the wrong way, but the idea is that all subjects have their own timeline and in this theory people can seize out the needed timeline and send them in the other way. Well, I think I need a second round to watch it again. I recommend you to restore your film experience after the long time lockdown with this masterpiece. Also, you’re welcome to write to us in the comments about what you think about Tenet.

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