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When I hear the word “Microsoft”, the first thing that appears in my mind is the most famous and popular operating system. Conservative, plain, and most importantly easy to use; these qualities are all about Microsoft. When you calmly sit there in front of your device, scrolling through the news, and there is an article in your feed: “Microsoft wants to buy TikTok”. What for? It’s the question without an answer, isn’t it? 

Some Microsoft projects that weren’t implemented to the max include: Mixer streaming service, Groove Music service, Windows Phone, and others, all lead us to believe that the company is seeking something. Now the Microsoft acquisition of TikTok seems like “here we go again”. 

If we examine the situation more carefully, such a move will boost Microsoft’s existing businesses, bringing it back to competing with players like YouTube and Facebook.

The Verge dug a bit deeper in their article and managed to find out the reason why Microsoft wants TikTok. And here is what they got.

Would you like a cup of personal data?

When Microsoft becomes the owner of TikTok, it’ll automatically own a rich supply of data and user information. This is what Trump wants to achieve; due to his concerns about American people being spied on by the Chinese government, he’ll reconsider his claim to make TikTok “out of business in the United States”. Microsoft supports such concerns and in its blog post the company mentioned the importance of their move, “Microsoft would ensure that all private data of TikTok’s American users is transferred to, and remains in, the United States.”

Microsoft could manipulate said data in several ways. Xbox Live has been the core data well for the company’s future projects. Moreover, all the information gathered will stimulate Microsoft to better understand how people use their Xbox. Microsoft used this information to understand how people interact with the Kinect accessory, with the result being the development of the HoloLens.

TikTok is a source of pure, mass consumer behavior that Microsoft is in need of. It’s been operating business software data for decades, that’s why the company has missed a huge piece of cake here. Microsoft wants to restore the gap and fill it with potential information for further usage.

Microsoft faces some tough conditions. Google was the first to occupy cloud services, providing millions of people who have gadgets and the internet with their own software for editing — Google Docs. Microsoft could lose in this battle without any interaction because future generations of young people may not need Microsoft software or services. 

TikTok is a direct bridge for millions of young people who use the app to create, share, and watch tons of content. You don’t need to think twice when the deal comes to the easiest way to create videos and share them.

AI-powered facial recognition and AR filters are both very delicious features that Microsoft will own after purchasing TikTok. This means that Microsoft can use this to develop the mobile world of AR.

Microsoft acquisition for TikTok is quite tough

Even though there’s no clear information on how Microsoft’s acquisition could influence TikTok, that doesn’t mean the company doesn’t have any plan. Microsoft states it  “would build on the experience TikTok users currently love”. 

One of Microsoft CEO Satya Nedella’s first big acquisitions was the company that developed Minecraft — Mojang. A brilliant success made Minecraft the iconic game that continues to grow.

LinkedIn is the other successful Nadella acquisition. The company has integrated LinkedIn into the company’s Office apps, allowing Outlook users to coauthor documents with LinkedIn contacts in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. 

If Microsoft’s TikTok deal will lead to success, TikTok will run separately, leaving users with the right to develop according their values. It’s hard to imagine what changes will be there in the future and how successful the deal will be between software giant Microsoft and TikTok. We shouldn’t miss a point that it is also a very political question, as it would benefit President Trump “who could claim to have unwound one of China’s stickiest footholds in the US tech ecosystem. And he wouldn’t be shy about highlighting his involvement,” The Verge writes.

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