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NASA uploaded the audio record of Jupiter’s moon it taped during the Juno mission. The spacecraft flew close to the Jovian moon Ganymede on June 7, 2021. It was the closest approach to the moon and NASA had a unique chance to seize a lot of data from this opportunity. On the audio record, you’ll hear the sound that resembles some kind of robot or dial-up modem. 

Juno has a Waves instrument aboard. This device helped NASA tune in to electric and magnetic radio waves produced in Jupiter’s magnetosphere and collected the data on those emissions. After that the data was converted into the audio range to make the audio track. Ganymede is Jupiter’s largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System to have a magnetosphere of its own. 

“This soundtrack is just wild enough to make you feel as if you were riding along as Juno sails past Ganymede for the first time in more than two decades,” said Bolton. “If you listen closely, you can hear the abrupt change to higher frequencies around the midpoint of the recording, which represents entry into a different region in Ganymede’s magnetosphere.”

Scientists consider decoding the audio as the next stage. This data is still a raw material that can show even more useful data about Jupiter’s moon. 

In addition to the audio track, other speakers at AGU provided updates on their latest findings of the Juno mission, including further exploration of Jupiter’s magnetosphere. According to new findings gathered from a magnetic anomaly near Jupiter’s equator known as the Great Blue Spot, Jupiter has experienced a change in its magnetic field during the last five years, and the Great Blue Spot is slowly drifting eastward at approximately 2 inches per second, taking 350 years to make its way around the planet.

The more familiar Great Red Spot, a violent anticyclone just south of the equator, drifts the opposite way at a faster pace, circling the planet every four and a half years.

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