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Two space-addicted billionaires Richard Branson and Jeff Bezos have already reached the edge of space recently and successfully landed on the Earth. Now it’s the turn for the most dedicated space enthusiast and billionaire in a one body Elon Musk to launch its space mission. 

All three businessmen open the door to commercial space travel, though it’s not quite affordable for people with average salaries because the price tag has a looooot of numbers in it. Fortunately, Elon Musk is working in a collaboration with Netflix. The streaming platform will capture SpaceX’s mission to space and make it in TV series format. Starting this week, Netflix will air the first two installments of Countdown: Inspiration4 Mission to Space, its first docuseries to cover an event – SpaceX’s launch of its first all-civilian crew on a three-day trip circling Earth – in “near real-time”. The first and the second episodes will demonstrate the preparation process for the 15 September launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The third and the fourth episodes will air just two days prior. A full-length film of the mission will see the world in late September. 

The director of this documentary film is sports documentarian Jason Hehir, best known for The Last Dance. He’ll demonstrate everything that had happened behind the curtains of the Inspiration4 mission including astronaut selection to the training and the actual launch. Netflix will also reach the edge of the space but in its niche, opening a new horizons for television.

“Inspiration4 is just a really small step along that journey toward a Jetsons world where everyone’s going to jump in their spacecraft and journey in the worlds beyond ours,” Jared Isaacman, the 38-year-old billionaire chief executive of Shift4 Payments and longtime flight enthusiast who will be the mission’s commander, told the Guardian. “I don’t think it’s just going to be a few people for a long time,” he added, comparing space travel now, executed by private companies such as Blue Origin or Virgin Galactic with exorbitant price tags, to the early days of experimental aviation. “This is starting with a few, for sure, but this going to open up to the many.”

The first two episodes of the Countdown introduce us to the four civilians who were lucky enough to become astronauts in the Inspiration4 mission.

The Guardian notices that only Isaacman (“Leadership”) paid money to participate in the mission but he refused to tell the amount but did say proceeds raised for the pediatric cancer specialists at St Jude’s children’s research hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, would exceed the cost of the mission. So the group consists of Hayley Arceneaux a 29-year old pediatric cancer survivor and physician assistant at St Jude’s which nominated her to symbolize the value of “Hope”; Sian Proctor, 51, of Phoenix, Arizona, a geology professor who won a spot on Inspiration4 through a competition assessing entrepreneurial spirit and the ability to go semi-viral (“Prosperity”); and Chris Sembrowski, 42, a data engineer and air force veteran from Everett, Washington, selected off a list of donors to St Jude’s as part of Inspiration4’s Superbowl campaign (“Generosity”).

These people don’t have any knowledge in space science, they are new to astrodynamics and cameras. It is a challenge for Hehir in comparison with The Last Dence where his team and him shot Michael Jordan. Though Countdown will build, in real-time, the iconography of Inspiration4, Hehir assures that the project is not acting as gauzy PR for the company – “I didn’t see it as our role to aggrandize SpaceX,” he told the Guardian. “I thought it was necessary to outline what their mission is, why are we doing this – because one of the first questions is always that it’s another billionaire going to space, what’s the point? The point is ambition, seeing what else is out there, and the point in a charitable sense is raising $200m for St Jude’s.”

More information about Countdown: Inspiration4 you can find right here.

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