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Pandemic chose a core target to hit people two years ago — live communication. But, look at the interesting solution of a problem from the capital of Lithuania Vilnius: a real-time “portal to another city. The design looks sophisticated in an interplanetary way, and the idea warms up the curiosity. The Verge compares this portal in its original article as something out of the erstwhile sci-fi movie/show Stargate.

You can find this circular “door” to another portal near its train station in Vilnius. It’s connected with the opposite “door” in Lublin, Poland, about 600 kilometers away. These portals have built-in cameras and large screens that can broadcast live images between two cities. It is like a rainbow bridge, but digital and without rainbows. According to its creators— meant to encourage people to “rethink the meaning of unity,” Go Vilnius said in a press release.

Vilnius, Lithuania says hi to Lublin, Poland.
Vilnius, Lithuania says hi to Lublin, Poland. Image credit: Go Vilnius

“Humanity is facing many potentially deadly challenges; be it social polarization, climate change, or economic issues. However, if we look closely, it’s not a lack of brilliant scientists, activists, leaders, knowledge, or technology causing these challenges. It’s tribalism, a lack of empathy and a narrow perception of the world, which is often limited to our national borders,” says Benediktas Gylys, President of the Benediktas Gylys Foundation and who Go Vilnius credits as the “initiator” of the portal idea. He says the project is “a bridge that unifies and an invitation to rise above prejudices and disagreements that belong to the past.”

The opposite portal in Liblin
The opposite portal in Liblin. Image credit: rozdroza.com

The circle design, meant to evoke the wheel of time, and a “well-known … sci-fi symbol,” was designed by engineers at the Creativity and Innovation Centre (LinkMenu fabrikas) at Vilnius Gediminas Technical University— aka Vilnius Tech. Developers were making these “portals” for five years, and ironically they revealed them at the end of a yearlong pandemic. In further development, the team wants to make more portals in other cities. The portal is a joint project with the Benediktas Gylys Foundation, the City of Vilnius, the City of Lublin, and the Crossroads Centre for Intercultural Creative Initiatives.
“From design and 3D modeling to digital content development and logistic challenges – a project like this requires a broad and multifunctional team,” said Adas Meskenas, director of LinkMenu fabrikas. “Meaningful projects like this one are born when diverse people succeed in working together and achieving synchronicity.”
Such a project is like a digital panacea for people who are eager to restore after communication hunger. Hopefully, such portals will appear in more cities to connect people from all over the world.

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